Posts Tagged ‘invasive species’

Spotted Lanternfly Discovered in New York State

Posted on: September 20th, 2018 by Brent Gotsch
Spotted Lanternfly is an emerging invasive species to our region. Photo:  USDA

Spot­ted Lantern­fly is an emerg­ing inva­sive species to our region. Photo: USDA

 

Recently, the New York State Depart­ment of Envi­ron­men­tal Con­ser­va­tion (NYSDEC) and the NYS Depart­ment of Agri­cul­ture and Mar­kets (NYSDAM) announced that Spot­ted Lantern­fly (Lycorma del­i­cat­ula) was dis­cov­ered in Albany and Yates coun­ties. So far only two sin­gle adult insects have been dis­cov­ered but the con­cern is that there could be more. First dis­cov­ered in Penn­syl­va­nia in 2014 Spot­ted Lantern­fly (SLF) has since been found in New Jer­sey, Delaware, Vir­ginia, and now New York.

SLF is an inva­sive species that is native to Asia, specif­i­cally parts of China, India, and Viet­nam. With no native preda­tors to keep its pop­u­la­tion in check, there is con­cern that SLF could have a sig­nif­i­cant impact on our native forests. Although their pri­mary source of food is the Tree of Heaven (Alianthus altissima), an inva­sive species itself which con­trary to pop­u­lar belief grows in more than just Brook­lyn, it has been known to feed on a wide vari­ety of plants includ­ing grapevine, hops, wal­nut and sev­eral types of fruit trees. This has the poten­tial to impact sev­eral multi-billion dol­lar indus­tries includ­ing grape and hop pro­duc­tion, the fruit grow­ers and log­ging. Sev­eral ripar­ian species are also at risk includ­ing maples, oaks, pines, poplars, sycamores, and wil­lows. This, cou­pled with the die-off of hem­locks and ash trees caused by Hem­lock Wooly Adel­gid and Emer­ald Ash Borer, respec­tively, could have severe con­se­quences for ripar­ian cor­ri­dor ecosys­tem health and stability.

 

Spotted Lanternfly egg masses. Photo:  USDA

Spot­ted Lantern­fly egg masses. Photo: USDA

 

SLF lay their eggs between the months of Sep­tem­ber and Decem­ber. Newly laid egg masses have a grey mud-like cov­er­ing that can take on a dry cracked appear­ance over time. Old egg masses appear as rows of 30–50 brown­ish seed-like deposits in 4–7 columns on the trunk that are roughly an inch long. Eggs hatch between the months of May and June. SLF nymphs emerge and are black with bright white spots. At this stage they are roughly the size of a pen­cil eraser. Over the next sev­eral months they grow larger but main­tain their col­ors until between the months of July and Sep­tem­ber where they turn bright red with dis­tinct patches of black and bright white spots. From July through Decem­ber SLF matures into an adult that has wings that are about 1-inch-long that are grey with black spots. When the wings are opened it reveals a red underwing.

Spotted Lanternfly early stage nymphs (black) and late state nymphs (red). Photo:  USDA

Spot­ted Lantern­fly early stage nymphs (black) and late state nymphs (red). Photo: USDA

 

SLF feeds by using it mouth­parts to pierce and then suck the sap from the trunks, branches, twigs and leaves. This cre­ates a weep­ing wound of sap. As it digests the sap, SLF secretes a sub­stance known as hon­ey­dew. This com­bined with the flow­ing sap tends to col­lect at the base of the trunk and pro­vides a fer­tile area for the growth of fungi and mold that may stunt plant growth or even cause pre­ma­ture death. It may also attract bees, wasps, ants and other insects to the site, fur­ther stress­ing the plant.

If you think you have SLF on your prop­erty please take a pho­to­graph of either the nymph, adult insect, egg mass, or infes­ta­tion sign along with an item for scale (such as coin or ruler) and email them to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Be sure to note the loca­tion includ­ing address, inter­sect­ing road, land­marks or GPS coor­di­nates. Also report the infes­ta­tion to iMap­In­va­sives.

For more infor­ma­tion on SLF be sure to visit the NYSDEC Web­site on SLF as well as web­sites devoted to SLF on the Penn­syl­va­nia Depart­ment of Agri­cul­ture and Penn State Exten­sion websites.

Adult Spotted Lanternfly. Photo:  USDA

Adult Spot­ted Lantern­fly. Photo: USDA

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Help Fight the Spread of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Posted on: June 15th, 2018 by Brent Gotsch
White Woolly egg ovisacs are an indicator for hemlock woodly adelgid infestation

White woolly egg ovisacs are an indi­ca­tor of hem­lock woolly adel­gid infestation

 

Hem­lock Woolly Adel­gid (HWA) is a non-native inva­sive insect that has killed mil­lions of hem­lock trees across the east­ern United States. In recent years it has been dev­as­tat­ing in the Catskill Moun­tain region and threat­ens not only hem­lock trees, but plants and ani­mals that rely on hem­locks for habitat.

Hem­locks are an impor­tant tree bor­der­ing moun­tain streams. Their branches and the spread and dis­tri­b­u­tion of nee­dles keep most of the sun­light from reach­ing the ground, cre­at­ing shade and dras­ti­cally reduc­ing stream tem­per­a­tures. Trout and other native species of fish rely on cold moun­tain streams to survive.

Researchers from Cor­nell University’s Depart­ment of Nat­ural Resources are using bio­log­i­cal con­trols such as preda­tor insects to help stop the spread of HWA. Groups such as Catskill Moun­tain­keeper and the Catskill Regional Inva­sive Species Part­ner­ship (CRISP) are pro­vid­ing edu­ca­tion and out­reach to let peo­ple know about the dan­gers HWA poses to forests and streams.

Be sure to watch this video from Catskill Moun­tain­keeper and learn more about what you can do to help stop the spread of this seri­ous for­est pest.

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National Invasive Species Awareness Week — Water Chestnut

Posted on: March 2nd, 2018 by Samantha Kahl

Wel­come to the final day of National Inva­sive Species Week! Thank you all for stick­ing with us. We hope you’ve learned a great deal and will con­tinue efforts in pre­serv­ing our native species! Last, but not least, we look at the aquatic inva­sive Water Chestnut.

Water Chest­nut is native to Eura­sia and Africa, intro­duced to the U.S. in the mid-1800’s as an orna­men­tal plant. It is found in fresh­wa­ter lakes and slow-moving streams and rivers. First notice in Sco­tia, NY, Water Chest­nut occurs in 43 coun­ties across New York State.

Inden­ti­fi­ca­tion

Water Chest­nut is an annual plant with float­ing triangluarly-shaped leaves con­tain­ing saw-toothed edges. The sub­merged, hol­low air-filled stems grow 12 to 15 feet in length that anchor them­selves in the soil. Four-petaled, white flow­ers bloom in June, with fruits con­tain­ing 4-inch spines with barbs. Seeds within the fruits remain viable up to 12 years. The fruits are key in spread­ing Water Chest­nut, as they detach from the stem and float to another area. The barbs aid in attach­ing the fruit to recre­ational water­crafts and fish­ing equipment.

Leaf system of Water Chestnut. photo courtesy of Northeast Aquatic Nuisance Species Panel

Leaf sys­tem of Water Chest­nut.
photo cour­tesy of North­east Aquatic Nui­sance Species Panel

Water Chestnut. photo courtesy of Northeast Aquatic Nuisance Species Panel

Water Chest­nut.
photo cour­tesy of North­east Aquatic Nui­sance Species Panel

Fruit of the Water Chestnut. photo courtesy of NYS Parks Boat Stewards

Fruit of the Water Chest­nut.
photo cour­tesy of NYS Parks Boat Stewards

So what’s the prob­lem?

Water Chest­nuts con­tain dense root mats that make water recre­ation extremely dif­fi­cult to get through. These dense mats also shade out native plants, which pro­vide food and shel­ter to native  fish, birds, and insects. When the dense mats decom­pose, the chem­i­cal processes involved decrease the amount of dis­solved oxy­gen in the water, poten­tially suf­fo­cat­ing fish and plant species. The fruits of the Water Chest­nut are often found along the shore­line and bot­tom of water­ways, mak­ing the barbs of the fruits extremely painful if stepped on.

What can be done?

A vari­ety of meth­ods in con­trol­ling Water Chest­nut include man­ual, mechan­i­cal, and chem­i­cal meth­ods. Early detec­tion is the best way to con­trol and even erad­i­cate this inva­sive aquatic plant, keep­ing costs and eco­log­i­cal impacts low. Hand-pulling is often done to smaller infected areas, though, when a site is too large, har­vest­ing machines can also be used. Chem­i­cal treat­ments should be done by NYS DEC pro­fes­sion­als only.

As a local com­mu­nity mem­ber, make sure to Clean, Drain, and Dry your water­craft and equip­ment before and after each use. Be sure to dump your bait bucket water where it came from or on land.

If you think you have found Water Chest­nut, take a look at the Water Chest­nut Fact Sheet. If con­firmed, the NYS DEC asks you take many pho­tos and sub­mit a report to iMap­In­va­sives. Please share this infor­ma­tion with others!


For more infor­ma­tion regard­ing local infes­ta­tions of Water Chest­nut, check out the Eso­pus Creek Con­ser­vancy here. Thank you again for tak­ing time to explore inva­sive species with us dur­ing National Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week! Check back soon for more updates from the Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Program!

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National Invasive Species Awareness Week — Didymo (Rock Snot)

Posted on: March 1st, 2018 by Samantha Kahl

Day 4 of National Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week is ded­i­cated to Rock Snot!

What is it?

Didy­mos­pher­nia gem­i­nata a.k.a. Didymo a.k.a. Rock Snot, is an aquatic, inva­sive, micro­scopic diatoma­ceous algae that pro­duces high vol­umes of stalk mate­r­ial, which is why you may see thick mats on stream bot­toms. It is often brown, tan, or white, with the appear­ance and tex­ture of wet wool that does not fall apart easily.

Didymo in the Esopus Creek. photo courtesy of NYIS

Didymo in the Eso­pus Creek.
photo cour­tesy of NYIS

How does this impact streams?

Because Didymo grows on the bot­tom of streams and still waters, and forms thick mats of mate­r­ial, it can last for months, despite occur­ring through­out some fast mov­ing streams. When Didymo grows, or blooms, it cov­ers entire stream beds, cov­er­ing over native organ­isms, and restrict­ing the avail­abil­ity of food for native fish species. It spreads quickly and eas­ily due to water recre­ation activ­i­ties. Fish­ing, kayaking/canoeing, tub­ing, and boat­ing allows the micro­scopic algea to attach onto your boots, waders, and boats, and if not cleaned off prop­erly, it will spread to the next body of water you go to. Cur­rently, there are no con­trol meth­ods avail­able to stop the spread and erad­i­cate Didymo.

Make it stop!

NYS DEC urges the pub­lic to use the “Inspect, Clean and Dry” method to decrease the spread of inva­sive species. If for any rea­son you can’t get your equip­ment clean and dry, restrict your equip­ment to a sin­gle water body.

Density Observations of Rock Snot. map courtesy of NYIS

Den­sity Obser­va­tions of Rock Snot.
map cour­tesy of NYIS


**Atten­tion Felt-Sole Waders! We encour­age you to con­sider other alter­na­tives, such as rub­ber stud­ded boots. Because felt-soles absorb Didymo cells and remain absorbent for long peri­ods of time, the spread of Didymo can increase rapidly if spe­cial treat­ments are not conducted.

Check back tomor­row for our final day of National Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week!

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National Invasive Species Awareness Week — Emerald Ash Borer

Posted on: February 28th, 2018 by Samantha Kahl

Happy Wednes­day! On this third day of National Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week, we’re tak­ing a closer look at the Emer­ald Ash Borer (EAB).

Accord­ing to the NYS DEC, The EAB is a bee­tle from Asia that was first found in Michi­gan in 2002. Sadly, the EAB infests and even­tu­ally kills North Amer­i­can Ash tree species, mak­ing every native Ash tree sus­cep­ti­ble to infestation.

Let’s get a closer look!

The EAB is very small, mea­sur­ing, at most, 0.5 inches long and 0.125 inches wide. The adults have a shim­mer­ing emer­ald green body with a cop­per or pur­ple abdomen on it’s under­side. You’ll often see these pests from May through Sep­tem­ber, but their prime activ­ity months are June and July. If you pass by an Ash tree, you will most likely see D-shaped exit holes in the branches and trunk of trees. Other signs of infec­tion include the yel­low­ing and brown­ing of tree leaves and less tree canopy present. Within 2 to 4 years, the Ash trees will suc­cumb to the EAB infestation.

ID the Emerald Ash Borer. photo courtesy of NYIS

ID the Emer­ald Ash Borer.
photo cour­tesy of NYIS

Emerald Ash Borer Larva inside an Ash tree. photo courtesy of Emerald Ash Borer Information Network

Emer­ald Ash Borer Larva inside an Ash tree.
photo cour­tesy of Emer­ald Ash Borer Infor­ma­tion Network

Emerald Ash Borer Damage to an Ash tree. photo courtesy of Woodworking Network

Emer­ald Ash Borer Dam­age to an Ash tree.
photo cour­tesy of Wood­work­ing Network

The EAB is found through­out the East­ern to Cen­tral United States and East­ern Canada. In New York, the first infes­ta­tion of EAB was sighted in Cat­ta­rau­gus County in 2009. It then spread to the Hud­son River Val­ley, and con­tin­ued on to more than 30 coun­ties. Infes­ta­tions were most recently found in Franklin and St. Lawrence Coun­ties in 2017.

Map of Emerald Ash Borer Locations. courtesy of NYS DEC

Map of Emer­ald Ash Borer Loca­tions.
cour­tesy of NYS DEC

 What can you do?

Review this EAB Early Detec­tion Brochure. If you believe you have an Emer­ald Ash Borer infes­ta­tion and are out­side of the known infes­ta­tion areas, call the Depart­ment of For­est Health Infor­ma­tion line (1–866-640‑0652).


 

Keep up with us this week in honor of National Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week and check back tomor­row to learn about a dif­fer­ent Inva­sive Species!

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National Invasive Species Awareness Week 2018 — Japanese Knotweed

Posted on: February 26th, 2018 by Samantha Kahl

Feb­ru­ary 26th marks the begin­ning of National Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week! Through­out this week, until March 2nd, we will be explor­ing dif­fer­ent inva­sive species present within our water­shed. To start off this week, we must first ask our­selves, “What is an inva­sive species?”. An inva­sive species is a species that is non-native to an ecosys­tem and has the poten­tial to cause envi­ron­men­tal harm to an area. Inva­sive species often out-compete native species, giv­ing native species lit­tle chance for sur­vival; this includes both ter­res­trial and aquatic plants and animals.

Japanese Knotweed within the Watershed

Japan­ese Knotweed within the Watershed

The first inva­sive species we’ll look at is Japan­ese Knotweed. This mon­ster of a plant came to the U.S. as an orna­men­tal plant in the 1800’s from East­ern Asia. Knotweed is iden­ti­fied by its large heart-shaped leaves, hol­low bamboo-like stalks, and clus­ters of white or cream col­ored flow­ers. It is often found near streams or rivers and it can with­stand low-light, high tem­per­a­tures, drought, and poor soil qual­ity, mak­ing this inva­sive resilient to many dif­fer­ent types of envi­ron­ments. Knotweed can grow up to 15 feet tall, with deep rhi­zomes (roots) extend­ing into the ground, mak­ing it very dif­fi­cult and timely to eradicate.

Photo of Japanese Knotweed leaves & flowers courtesy of http://www.nyis.info

Photo of Japan­ese Knotweed leaves & flow­ers cour­tesy of http://www.nyis.info

Col­lab­o­ra­tion and coor­di­na­tion from as many peo­ple and orga­ni­za­tions as pos­si­ble is the best way to tackle Japan­ese Knotweed. In order to con­trol it, one must be dili­gent. The Catskill Regional Inva­sive Species Part­ner­ship (CRISP) rec­om­mends con­tin­u­ous man­ual removal of Knotweed approx­i­mately 2–3 times each year for at least 3 years, or until it is erad­i­cated. Accord­ing to New York Inva­sive Species Infor­ma­tion (NYIS), mow­ing or cut­ting of Japan­ese Knotweed will actu­ally spread the plant, rather than con­tain it. For those who would like to use her­bi­cides on large vol­umes of Knotweed, call your local CCE or Soil and Water Con­ser­va­tion Dis­trict office to get more infor­ma­tion on chem­i­cal reg­u­la­tions and safety pre­cau­tions in your region.

 

Videos regard­ing Inva­sive Species in New York State:

Pre­vent the Spread of Inva­sive Species

Get to Know Inva­sive Plants

 

Fol­low us this week as we uncover more inva­sive species in our Ashokan Water­shed! Face­bookTwit­terInsta­gram

 

 

 

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The Catskill Interpretive Center Riparian Buffer Demonstration Project Planted!

Posted on: November 15th, 2016 by Caroline Stupple
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Set­ting the stage to plant all of the native plant mate­r­ial at the Catskill Inter­pre­tive Center.

In Sep­tem­ber 2016, a group of ded­i­cated vol­un­teers, together with the Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Pro­gram (AWSMP) and the Catskill Streams Buffer Ini­tia­tive (CSBI) team, got together to remove some of the inva­sive species that had taken over the ripar­ian (stream­side) areas and out-competed native plants at the Mau­rice D. Hinchey Catskill Inter­pre­tive Cen­ter (CIC). The CIC received fund­ing from AWSMP and CSBI to cre­ate a Ripar­ian Buffer Demon­stra­tion project.  The main objec­tives for this project are removal of inva­sive species, plant­ing of native plant mate­r­ial, and plac­ing inter­pre­tive sig­nage around the project area to pro­vide edu­ca­tion on the role of ripar­ian buffers in main­tain­ing habi­tat and stream health.

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The team (from left to right), Bobby Tay­lor, Alli­son Lent, Jake Wede­meyer, and Tiffany Runge of Ulster County Soil and Water Con­ser­va­tion Dis­trict, removed a whole lot of inva­sive plant material!

 

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Upstream of the Ripar­ian Buffer Demon­stra­tion area. The under story is cov­ered in inva­sive species. This under story com­po­si­tion extended towards the demon­stra­tion area.

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Ripar­ian Buffer Demon­stra­tion project area cleared of inva­sive plants!

 

Ear­lier this fall the CSBI team removed the last of the inva­sive plant mate­r­ial and planted the ripar­ian buffer with native plants.  Inva­sive species are fast grow­ing, espe­cially in dis­turbed areas, as such, as much plant mate­r­ial as pos­si­ble was removed to give the native plants the best chance to estab­lish them­selves. Native ripar­ian tree and shrub species form dense root sys­tems that pro­vide excel­lent bank sta­bi­liza­tion in ripar­ian zones, an area that is prone to ero­sion. This com­plex root sys­tem con­trasts sharply to the shal­low and fast-growing root sys­tems that inva­sive species have, that are part of their abil­ity to rapidly col­o­nize an area. A restored ripar­ian buffer pro­vides nat­ural habi­tat for native species and enhances water qual­ity, an impor­tant resource for humans, native fish and macro-invertebrates.

 

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Ripar­ian buffer area cleared of inva­sive plants.

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The native trees and shrubs are planted!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The CIC Ripar­ian Buffer Demon­stra­tion is a col­lab­o­ra­tive project between The Catskill Cen­ter, the NYS Depart­ment of Envi­ron­men­tal Con­ser­va­tion, NYC Depart­ment of Envi­ron­men­tal Pro­tec­tion, Cor­nell Coop­er­a­tive Exten­sion of Ulster County, and the Ulster County Soil & Water Con­ser­va­tion District.

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Out With The Invasive, In With The Native

Posted on: September 12th, 2016 by Caroline Stupple

On Sat­ur­day, Sep­tem­ber 10th the Catskill Inter­pre­tive Cen­ter (CIC) held a vol­un­teer inva­sive pull event on their prop­erty. The area is to be pre­pared for a Ripar­ian Buffer Demon­stra­tion project lead by the Catskill Streams Buffer Ini­tia­tive (CSBI). The CIC received fund­ing from the Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Pro­gram (AWSMP) and CSBI to remove the inva­sive species, replace them with native trees and shrubs, and cre­ate edu­ca­tional mate­r­ial to inform the com­mu­nity on the impor­tance of stream­side buffers.

Bobby Tay­lor, CSBI Coor­di­na­tor, teach­ing the vol­un­teers how to iden­tify com­mon ripar­ian inva­sive plant species.

Our day started off with a short pre-event rain storm that helped to cool off the pre­vi­ous mug­gi­ness of the day. Once all of the vol­un­teers gath­ered, CSBI coor­di­na­tor Bobby Tay­lor held an edu­ca­tional talk about inva­sive species’ role in the envi­ron­ment and dif­fer­ent impor­tant man­age­ment options. We were pleased to learn just how much our par­tic­i­pants already know about inva­sives and how pas­sion­ate they are about lim­it­ing inva­sive species spread and man­ag­ing them on their own prop­er­ties. Our con­ver­sa­tions touched on just how eas­ily inva­sive species out­com­pete native species and decrease bio­di­ver­sity and how they can dras­ti­cally affect native organ­isms that rely on native habi­tat. It is always inspir­ing to inter­act with com­mu­nity mem­bers who are deal­ing with and care about the same issues we are tackling.

With shov­els, pick­axes, uproot­ers, bugspray, and sheer deter­mi­na­tion in hand, the vol­un­teers set out with one mis­sion; to get those pesky plants out! And boy did that deter­mi­na­tion go a long way! We were utterly blown away at how great of a team the vol­un­teers made and how much mate­r­ial we were able to clear. As our day wound down we had a lovely pic­nic lunch, pro­vided by the CIC, and got to sit down with the vol­un­teers and get to know them a bit. Our pro­duc­tive day ended with good food and great company!

Vol­un­teers iden­tify and pull inva­sive species at the Ripar­ian Buffer Demon­stra­tion project site at the CIC.

At the root of the pull project and the impend­ing ripar­ian restora­tion in the fall, is the impor­tance of stream buffers to water qual­ity, habi­tat, and flood­plain sta­bil­ity.  A small ephemeral stream, one that has flow­ing water dur­ing and fol­low­ing a rain fall or snow melt event, runs through the back of the CIC prop­erty; adja­cent to the stream is the spe­cial zone called the flood­plain. These flood­plains are highly sus­cep­ti­ble to inva­sive species because seeds and frag­ments of plant mate­r­ial can so eas­ily be car­ried by flow­ing water and deposited downstream.

This issue is far from only being a stream­side prob­lem. Many peo­ple, groups, and even gov­ern­ment agen­cies deal with inva­sive species man­age­ment on a daily basis. It takes all mem­bers of a com­mu­nity to really stop the inva­sion and elim­i­nate the future intro­duc­tion of non­na­tive and inva­sive species. Our amaz­ing group of vol­un­teers was not only hard­work­ing, but also enthu­si­as­tic about envi­ron­men­tal pro­tec­tion, con­tin­u­ing their own fight against inva­sives on their prop­er­ties, and help­ing to edu­cate oth­ers to do the same.

CSBI, AWSMP,the CIC, and the NYS Depart­ment of Envi­ron­men­tal Con­ser­va­tion wants to thank all those who par­tic­i­pated and made our Inva­sive Pull Event a suc­cess on all levels!

If you would like to learn more about inva­sive species, what you can do, or about the sup­port avail­able to stream­side landown­ers please visit the CSBI web­site at http://catskillstreams.org/ or con­tact CSBI Coor­di­na­tor Bobby Tay­lor at bobby.taylor@ashokanstreams.org. If you would like to learn more about the Ashokan Water­shed please visit AWSMP’s web­site at ashokanstreams.org or con­tact us at 845 688 3047.

 

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It is Invasive Species Awareness Week!

Posted on: July 15th, 2016 by Caroline Stupple

Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week (ISAW) is a col­lab­o­ra­tion between mul­ti­ple regional, state, and fed­eral agen­cies. ISAW seeks to enhance aware­ness of inva­sive species and pro­vide peo­ple with tools for man­age­ment. Locally, through­out the Catskill area, the Catskill Regional Inva­sive Species Part­ner­ship (CRISP) pro­vides edu­ca­tional mate­r­ial and sup­port for inva­sive species removal. A focal species for man­age­ment has been Japan­ese knotweed.

Japan­ese Knotweed was intro­duced to the United States some­time in the late 1800s and was touted as an excel­lent gar­den orna­men­tal plant. It was soon iden­ti­fied as an inva­sive species due to its aggres­sive spread through­out and beyond the region of intro­duc­tion and its ten­dency to out­com­pete native plant species.  In Ulster County, though we are not alone in this strug­gle, we have seen the tremen­dous spread of knotweed espe­cially along stream sides. Its migra­tion is highly effi­cient along these buffer zones due to its abil­ity to reestab­lish a new stand from a small root frag­ment washed downstream.

 

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Japan­ese knotweed stand along left side of stream. Photo by Ulster County Soil and Water Con­ser­va­tion District.

 

Knotweed can be iden­ti­fied by its large heart-shaped leaves, hol­low bamboo-like stalks, and the clus­ter of white or cream col­ored flow­ers. Stands of knotweed are immensely dif­fi­cult and time con­sum­ing to erad­i­cate, how­ever, it can be man­aged with vig­i­lance and patience. Among other man­age­ment plans, CRISP sug­gests rou­tine and con­tin­u­ous removal of knotweed stands or her­bi­cide injec­tions into the stocks.  Man­ual removal of knotweed can be time con­sum­ing, as removals must reoc­cur 2–3 times every year for 3 or more years. Addi­tion­ally, due to the ease with which knotweed spreads the herba­ceous mate­r­ial must be dis­posed of prop­erly; dis­posal includes let­ting the mate­r­ial dry out and burn­ing it when dried. Injec­tion of the her­bi­cide is also time con­sum­ing and may not be prac­ti­cal for a large knotweed stand. The her­bi­cide must be injected into each stalk at approx­i­mately the 3rd node on the stalk dur­ing the late sum­mer and early fall months.

The bat­tle against Japan­ese knotweed is best fought on many fronts and with coor­di­na­tion and efforts from as many peo­ple as pos­si­ble. If you would like to know more about how you can help with Japan­ese knotweed erad­i­ca­tion and man­age­ment in your area, or would like to learn more about other inva­sive species in the area, please click here to be directed to the CRISP web­site. If you would like to learn more about the annual Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week and to get more infor­ma­tion about New York inva­sive species, please click here.

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Videos from 2015 Ashokan Watershed Conference Available Online

Posted on: May 14th, 2015 by Brent Gotsch

Full length videos from the 2015 Ashokan Water­shed Con­fer­ence held on April 10 at the Ashokan Cen­ter in Olive­bridge are now avail­able for view­ing on the AWSMP Youtube chan­nel.

Watch and lis­ten as Bob Steud­ing speaks about the build­ing of the Ashokan Reser­voir and the social forces that drove it. Learn from Pro­fes­sional Engi­neer George Fowler how his­tor­i­cal stream man­age­ment prac­tices have caused last­ing impacts on our region’s streams. Become engaged while lis­ten­ing to for­est ento­mol­o­gist Mark Whit­more and Town of Wood­stock Envi­ron­men­tal Com­mis­sion Chair­man Jim Han­son explain how inva­sive insects like Hem­lock Woolly Adel­gid and Emer­ald Ash Borer are threat­en­ing our native forests, the impacts they will cause and the work that com­mu­ni­ties need to do to pre­pare for them. Finally,  hear from a panel of “steam experts” as they answer some of the more com­mon and press­ing ques­tions that the pub­lic has about streams and how they are managed.

This is a great oppor­tu­nity for those who missed the con­fer­ence but want to hear the speaker pre­sen­ta­tions, or for those who attended and want to revisit some infor­ma­tion  they may have for­got­ten. There are a num­ber of other great videos from past con­fer­ences and events on the chan­nel so be sure to check those out too!

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