Posts Tagged ‘Invasive’

Spotted Lanternfly Discovered in New York State

Posted on: September 20th, 2018 by Brent Gotsch
Spotted Lanternfly is an emerging invasive species to our region. Photo:  USDA

Spot­ted Lantern­fly is an emerg­ing inva­sive species to our region. Photo: USDA

 

Recently, the New York State Depart­ment of Envi­ron­men­tal Con­ser­va­tion (NYSDEC) and the NYS Depart­ment of Agri­cul­ture and Mar­kets (NYSDAM) announced that Spot­ted Lantern­fly (Lycorma del­i­cat­ula) was dis­cov­ered in Albany and Yates coun­ties. So far only two sin­gle adult insects have been dis­cov­ered but the con­cern is that there could be more. First dis­cov­ered in Penn­syl­va­nia in 2014 Spot­ted Lantern­fly (SLF) has since been found in New Jer­sey, Delaware, Vir­ginia, and now New York.

SLF is an inva­sive species that is native to Asia, specif­i­cally parts of China, India, and Viet­nam. With no native preda­tors to keep its pop­u­la­tion in check, there is con­cern that SLF could have a sig­nif­i­cant impact on our native forests. Although their pri­mary source of food is the Tree of Heaven (Alianthus altissima), an inva­sive species itself which con­trary to pop­u­lar belief grows in more than just Brook­lyn, it has been known to feed on a wide vari­ety of plants includ­ing grapevine, hops, wal­nut and sev­eral types of fruit trees. This has the poten­tial to impact sev­eral multi-billion dol­lar indus­tries includ­ing grape and hop pro­duc­tion, the fruit grow­ers and log­ging. Sev­eral ripar­ian species are also at risk includ­ing maples, oaks, pines, poplars, sycamores, and wil­lows. This, cou­pled with the die-off of hem­locks and ash trees caused by Hem­lock Wooly Adel­gid and Emer­ald Ash Borer, respec­tively, could have severe con­se­quences for ripar­ian cor­ri­dor ecosys­tem health and stability.

 

Spotted Lanternfly egg masses. Photo:  USDA

Spot­ted Lantern­fly egg masses. Photo: USDA

 

SLF lay their eggs between the months of Sep­tem­ber and Decem­ber. Newly laid egg masses have a grey mud-like cov­er­ing that can take on a dry cracked appear­ance over time. Old egg masses appear as rows of 30–50 brown­ish seed-like deposits in 4–7 columns on the trunk that are roughly an inch long. Eggs hatch between the months of May and June. SLF nymphs emerge and are black with bright white spots. At this stage they are roughly the size of a pen­cil eraser. Over the next sev­eral months they grow larger but main­tain their col­ors until between the months of July and Sep­tem­ber where they turn bright red with dis­tinct patches of black and bright white spots. From July through Decem­ber SLF matures into an adult that has wings that are about 1-inch-long that are grey with black spots. When the wings are opened it reveals a red underwing.

Spotted Lanternfly early stage nymphs (black) and late state nymphs (red). Photo:  USDA

Spot­ted Lantern­fly early stage nymphs (black) and late state nymphs (red). Photo: USDA

 

SLF feeds by using it mouth­parts to pierce and then suck the sap from the trunks, branches, twigs and leaves. This cre­ates a weep­ing wound of sap. As it digests the sap, SLF secretes a sub­stance known as hon­ey­dew. This com­bined with the flow­ing sap tends to col­lect at the base of the trunk and pro­vides a fer­tile area for the growth of fungi and mold that may stunt plant growth or even cause pre­ma­ture death. It may also attract bees, wasps, ants and other insects to the site, fur­ther stress­ing the plant.

If you think you have SLF on your prop­erty please take a pho­to­graph of either the nymph, adult insect, egg mass, or infes­ta­tion sign along with an item for scale (such as coin or ruler) and email them to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Be sure to note the loca­tion includ­ing address, inter­sect­ing road, land­marks or GPS coor­di­nates. Also report the infes­ta­tion to iMap­In­va­sives.

For more infor­ma­tion on SLF be sure to visit the NYSDEC Web­site on SLF as well as web­sites devoted to SLF on the Penn­syl­va­nia Depart­ment of Agri­cul­ture and Penn State Exten­sion websites.

Adult Spotted Lanternfly. Photo:  USDA

Adult Spot­ted Lantern­fly. Photo: USDA

Share

National Invasive Species Awareness Week — Emerald Ash Borer

Posted on: February 28th, 2018 by Samantha Kahl

Happy Wednes­day! On this third day of National Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week, we’re tak­ing a closer look at the Emer­ald Ash Borer (EAB).

Accord­ing to the NYS DEC, The EAB is a bee­tle from Asia that was first found in Michi­gan in 2002. Sadly, the EAB infests and even­tu­ally kills North Amer­i­can Ash tree species, mak­ing every native Ash tree sus­cep­ti­ble to infestation.

Let’s get a closer look!

The EAB is very small, mea­sur­ing, at most, 0.5 inches long and 0.125 inches wide. The adults have a shim­mer­ing emer­ald green body with a cop­per or pur­ple abdomen on it’s under­side. You’ll often see these pests from May through Sep­tem­ber, but their prime activ­ity months are June and July. If you pass by an Ash tree, you will most likely see D-shaped exit holes in the branches and trunk of trees. Other signs of infec­tion include the yel­low­ing and brown­ing of tree leaves and less tree canopy present. Within 2 to 4 years, the Ash trees will suc­cumb to the EAB infestation.

ID the Emerald Ash Borer. photo courtesy of NYIS

ID the Emer­ald Ash Borer.
photo cour­tesy of NYIS

Emerald Ash Borer Larva inside an Ash tree. photo courtesy of Emerald Ash Borer Information Network

Emer­ald Ash Borer Larva inside an Ash tree.
photo cour­tesy of Emer­ald Ash Borer Infor­ma­tion Network

Emerald Ash Borer Damage to an Ash tree. photo courtesy of Woodworking Network

Emer­ald Ash Borer Dam­age to an Ash tree.
photo cour­tesy of Wood­work­ing Network

The EAB is found through­out the East­ern to Cen­tral United States and East­ern Canada. In New York, the first infes­ta­tion of EAB was sighted in Cat­ta­rau­gus County in 2009. It then spread to the Hud­son River Val­ley, and con­tin­ued on to more than 30 coun­ties. Infes­ta­tions were most recently found in Franklin and St. Lawrence Coun­ties in 2017.

Map of Emerald Ash Borer Locations. courtesy of NYS DEC

Map of Emer­ald Ash Borer Loca­tions.
cour­tesy of NYS DEC

 What can you do?

Review this EAB Early Detec­tion Brochure. If you believe you have an Emer­ald Ash Borer infes­ta­tion and are out­side of the known infes­ta­tion areas, call the Depart­ment of For­est Health Infor­ma­tion line (1–866-640‑0652).


 

Keep up with us this week in honor of National Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week and check back tomor­row to learn about a dif­fer­ent Inva­sive Species!

Check us out on Face­bookTwit­ter, and Insta­gram

Share