New Student Video “All About Water”

Posted on: June 28th, 2017 by Leslie_Zucker

Students at the Bennett Intermediate School in Boiceville are sharing their knowledge of water in a 22-minute educational video that is now available online.

The students – all members of the “Watershed Detectives” after-school science club, were motivated to convince others of water’s importance and what can be done to protect and conserve water. The group of fourth- and fifth-graders served on the video production crew as directors, actors, camera, light and sound technicians, cue-card holders, and script planners.

The video is a resource for elementary school science teachers and aligns directly with science concepts learned in class. Students produced the video over 2.5 months with help from Watershed Detectives club leader Matt Savatgy, who wrote the movie script with input from club members. Savatgy, a youth educator with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ulster County, said the students didn’t want people to take water for granted.

Students in the video describe how water plays an important role in their daily lives. And the science club members had plenty of fun and challenges to overcome during shooting. Students had to reshoot scenes due to unforeseen situations such as background noise, people walking in on takes or the actors “fumbling” their lines. The students did a water bottle flip as the very last fun thing.

The video was made possible with funding from the NYC DEP provided to the Ashokan Watershed Stream Management Program in support of education and outreach.

The video can be watched at https://vimeo.com/217747279.

Students Alexis (Sasha) Nielsen, 10, and Landry Mack, 10, at the Bennett Intermediate School practice their lines for a student-produced science video with help from Extension Educator Matt Savatgy.  Courtesy of David Laks, 2017.

Students Alexis (Sasha) Nielsen, 10, and Landry Mack, 10, at the Bennett Intermediate School practice their lines for a student-produced science video with help from Extension Educator Matt Savatgy. Courtesy of David Laks, 2017.

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