Posts Tagged ‘invasive species’

Spotted Lanternfly Discovered in New York State

Posted on: September 20th, 2018 by Brent Gotsch
Spotted Lanternfly is an emerging invasive species to our region. Photo:  USDA

Spot­ted Lantern­fly is an emerg­ing inva­sive species to our region. Pho­to: USDA

 

Recent­ly, the New York State Depart­ment of Envi­ron­men­tal Con­ser­va­tion (NYSDEC) and the NYS Depart­ment of Agri­cul­ture and Mar­kets (NYSDAM) announced that Spot­ted Lantern­fly (Lycor­ma del­i­cat­u­la) was dis­cov­ered in Albany and Yates coun­ties. So far only two sin­gle adult insects have been dis­cov­ered but the con­cern is that there could be more. First dis­cov­ered in Penn­syl­va­nia in 2014 Spot­ted Lantern­fly (SLF) has since been found in New Jer­sey, Delaware, Vir­ginia, and now New York.

SLF is an inva­sive species that is native to Asia, specif­i­cal­ly parts of Chi­na, India, and Viet­nam. With no native preda­tors to keep its pop­u­la­tion in check, there is con­cern that SLF could have a sig­nif­i­cant impact on our native forests. Although their pri­ma­ry source of food is the Tree of Heav­en (Alianthus altissi­ma), an inva­sive species itself which con­trary to pop­u­lar belief grows in more than just Brook­lyn, it has been known to feed on a wide vari­ety of plants includ­ing grapevine, hops, wal­nut and sev­er­al types of fruit trees. This has the poten­tial to impact sev­er­al mul­ti-bil­lion dol­lar indus­tries includ­ing grape and hop pro­duc­tion, the fruit grow­ers and log­ging. Sev­er­al ripar­i­an species are also at risk includ­ing maples, oaks, pines, poplars, sycamores, and wil­lows. This, cou­pled with the die-off of hem­locks and ash trees caused by Hem­lock Wooly Adel­gid and Emer­ald Ash Bor­er, respec­tive­ly, could have severe con­se­quences for ripar­i­an cor­ri­dor ecosys­tem health and sta­bil­i­ty.

 

Spotted Lanternfly egg masses. Photo:  USDA

Spot­ted Lantern­fly egg mass­es. Pho­to: USDA

 

SLF lay their eggs between the months of Sep­tem­ber and Decem­ber. New­ly laid egg mass­es have a grey mud-like cov­er­ing that can take on a dry cracked appear­ance over time. Old egg mass­es appear as rows of 30–50 brown­ish seed-like deposits in 4–7 columns on the trunk that are rough­ly an inch long. Eggs hatch between the months of May and June. SLF nymphs emerge and are black with bright white spots. At this stage they are rough­ly the size of a pen­cil eras­er. Over the next sev­er­al months they grow larg­er but main­tain their col­ors until between the months of July and Sep­tem­ber where they turn bright red with dis­tinct patch­es of black and bright white spots. From July through Decem­ber SLF matures into an adult that has wings that are about 1‑inch-long that are grey with black spots. When the wings are opened it reveals a red under­wing.

Spotted Lanternfly early stage nymphs (black) and late state nymphs (red). Photo:  USDA

Spot­ted Lantern­fly ear­ly stage nymphs (black) and late state nymphs (red). Pho­to: USDA

 

SLF feeds by using it mouth­parts to pierce and then suck the sap from the trunks, branch­es, twigs and leaves. This cre­ates a weep­ing wound of sap. As it digests the sap, SLF secretes a sub­stance known as hon­ey­dew. This com­bined with the flow­ing sap tends to col­lect at the base of the trunk and pro­vides a fer­tile area for the growth of fun­gi and mold that may stunt plant growth or even cause pre­ma­ture death. It may also attract bees, wasps, ants and oth­er insects to the site, fur­ther stress­ing the plant.

If you think you have SLF on your prop­er­ty please take a pho­to­graph of either the nymph, adult insect, egg mass, or infes­ta­tion sign along with an item for scale (such as coin or ruler) and email them to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Be sure to note the loca­tion includ­ing address, inter­sect­ing road, land­marks or GPS coor­di­nates. Also report the infes­ta­tion to iMap­In­va­sives.

For more infor­ma­tion on SLF be sure to vis­it the NYSDEC Web­site on SLF as well as web­sites devot­ed to SLF on the Penn­syl­va­nia Depart­ment of Agri­cul­ture and Penn State Exten­sion web­sites.

Adult Spotted Lanternfly. Photo:  USDA

Adult Spot­ted Lantern­fly. Pho­to: USDA

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Help Fight the Spread of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Posted on: June 15th, 2018 by Brent Gotsch
White Woolly egg ovisacs are an indicator for hemlock woodly adelgid infestation

White wool­ly egg ovisacs are an indi­ca­tor of hem­lock wool­ly adel­gid infes­ta­tion

 

Hem­lock Wool­ly Adel­gid (HWA) is a non-native inva­sive insect that has killed mil­lions of hem­lock trees across the east­ern Unit­ed States. In recent years it has been dev­as­tat­ing in the Catskill Moun­tain region and threat­ens not only hem­lock trees, but plants and ani­mals that rely on hem­locks for habi­tat.

Hem­locks are an impor­tant tree bor­der­ing moun­tain streams. Their branch­es and the spread and dis­tri­b­u­tion of nee­dles keep most of the sun­light from reach­ing the ground, cre­at­ing shade and dras­ti­cal­ly reduc­ing stream tem­per­a­tures. Trout and oth­er native species of fish rely on cold moun­tain streams to sur­vive.

Researchers from Cor­nell Uni­ver­si­ty’s Depart­ment of Nat­ur­al Resources are using bio­log­i­cal con­trols such as preda­tor insects to help stop the spread of HWA. Groups such as Catskill Moun­tain­keep­er and the Catskill Region­al Inva­sive Species Part­ner­ship (CRISP) are pro­vid­ing edu­ca­tion and out­reach to let peo­ple know about the dan­gers HWA pos­es to forests and streams.

Be sure to watch this video from Catskill Moun­tain­keep­er and learn more about what you can do to help stop the spread of this seri­ous for­est pest.

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National Invasive Species Awareness Week — Water Chestnut

Posted on: March 2nd, 2018 by Samantha Kahl

Wel­come to the final day of Nation­al Inva­sive Species Week! Thank you all for stick­ing with us. We hope you’ve learned a great deal and will con­tin­ue efforts in pre­serv­ing our native species! Last, but not least, we look at the aquat­ic inva­sive Water Chest­nut.

Water Chest­nut is native to Eura­sia and Africa, intro­duced to the U.S. in the mid-1800’s as an orna­men­tal plant. It is found in fresh­wa­ter lakes and slow-mov­ing streams and rivers. First notice in Sco­tia, NY, Water Chest­nut occurs in 43 coun­ties across New York State.

Inden­ti­fi­ca­tion

Water Chest­nut is an annu­al plant with float­ing tri­an­glu­ar­ly-shaped leaves con­tain­ing saw-toothed edges. The sub­merged, hol­low air-filled stems grow 12 to 15 feet in length that anchor them­selves in the soil. Four-petaled, white flow­ers bloom in June, with fruits con­tain­ing 4‑inch spines with barbs. Seeds with­in the fruits remain viable up to 12 years. The fruits are key in spread­ing Water Chest­nut, as they detach from the stem and float to anoth­er area. The barbs aid in attach­ing the fruit to recre­ation­al water­crafts and fish­ing equip­ment.

Leaf system of Water Chestnut. photo courtesy of Northeast Aquatic Nuisance Species Panel

Leaf sys­tem of Water Chest­nut.
pho­to cour­tesy of North­east Aquat­ic Nui­sance Species Pan­el

Water Chestnut. photo courtesy of Northeast Aquatic Nuisance Species Panel

Water Chest­nut.
pho­to cour­tesy of North­east Aquat­ic Nui­sance Species Pan­el

Fruit of the Water Chestnut. photo courtesy of NYS Parks Boat Stewards

Fruit of the Water Chest­nut.
pho­to cour­tesy of NYS Parks Boat Stew­ards

So what’s the prob­lem?

Water Chest­nuts con­tain dense root mats that make water recre­ation extreme­ly dif­fi­cult to get through. These dense mats also shade out native plants, which pro­vide food and shel­ter to native  fish, birds, and insects. When the dense mats decom­pose, the chem­i­cal process­es involved decrease the amount of dis­solved oxy­gen in the water, poten­tial­ly suf­fo­cat­ing fish and plant species. The fruits of the Water Chest­nut are often found along the shore­line and bot­tom of water­ways, mak­ing the barbs of the fruits extreme­ly painful if stepped on.

What can be done?

A vari­ety of meth­ods in con­trol­ling Water Chest­nut include man­u­al, mechan­i­cal, and chem­i­cal meth­ods. Ear­ly detec­tion is the best way to con­trol and even erad­i­cate this inva­sive aquat­ic plant, keep­ing costs and eco­log­i­cal impacts low. Hand-pulling is often done to small­er infect­ed areas, though, when a site is too large, har­vest­ing machines can also be used. Chem­i­cal treat­ments should be done by NYS DEC pro­fes­sion­als only.

As a local com­mu­ni­ty mem­ber, make sure to Clean, Drain, and Dry your water­craft and equip­ment before and after each use. Be sure to dump your bait buck­et water where it came from or on land.

If you think you have found Water Chest­nut, take a look at the Water Chest­nut Fact Sheet. If con­firmed, the NYS DEC asks you take many pho­tos and sub­mit a report to iMap­In­va­sives. Please share this infor­ma­tion with oth­ers!


For more infor­ma­tion regard­ing local infes­ta­tions of Water Chest­nut, check out the Eso­pus Creek Con­ser­van­cy here. Thank you again for tak­ing time to explore inva­sive species with us dur­ing Nation­al Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week! Check back soon for more updates from the Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Pro­gram!

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National Invasive Species Awareness Week — Didymo (Rock Snot)

Posted on: March 1st, 2018 by Samantha Kahl

Day 4 of Nation­al Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week is ded­i­cat­ed to Rock Snot!

What is it?

Didy­mos­pher­nia gem­i­na­ta a.k.a. Didy­mo a.k.a. Rock Snot, is an aquat­ic, inva­sive, micro­scop­ic diatoma­ceous algae that pro­duces high vol­umes of stalk mate­r­i­al, which is why you may see thick mats on stream bot­toms. It is often brown, tan, or white, with the appear­ance and tex­ture of wet wool that does not fall apart eas­i­ly.

Didymo in the Esopus Creek. photo courtesy of NYIS

Didy­mo in the Eso­pus Creek.
pho­to cour­tesy of NYIS

How does this impact streams?

Because Didy­mo grows on the bot­tom of streams and still waters, and forms thick mats of mate­r­i­al, it can last for months, despite occur­ring through­out some fast mov­ing streams. When Didy­mo grows, or blooms, it cov­ers entire stream beds, cov­er­ing over native organ­isms, and restrict­ing the avail­abil­i­ty of food for native fish species. It spreads quick­ly and eas­i­ly due to water recre­ation activ­i­ties. Fish­ing, kayaking/canoeing, tub­ing, and boat­ing allows the micro­scop­ic algea to attach onto your boots, waders, and boats, and if not cleaned off prop­er­ly, it will spread to the next body of water you go to. Cur­rent­ly, there are no con­trol meth­ods avail­able to stop the spread and erad­i­cate Didy­mo.

Make it stop!

NYS DEC urges the pub­lic to use the “Inspect, Clean and Dry” method to decrease the spread of inva­sive species. If for any rea­son you can’t get your equip­ment clean and dry, restrict your equip­ment to a sin­gle water body.

Density Observations of Rock Snot. map courtesy of NYIS

Den­si­ty Obser­va­tions of Rock Snot.
map cour­tesy of NYIS


**Atten­tion Felt-Sole Waders! We encour­age you to con­sid­er oth­er alter­na­tives, such as rub­ber stud­ded boots. Because felt-soles absorb Didy­mo cells and remain absorbent for long peri­ods of time, the spread of Didy­mo can increase rapid­ly if spe­cial treat­ments are not con­duct­ed.

Check back tomor­row for our final day of Nation­al Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week!

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National Invasive Species Awareness Week — Emerald Ash Borer

Posted on: February 28th, 2018 by Samantha Kahl

Hap­py Wednes­day! On this third day of Nation­al Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week, we’re tak­ing a clos­er look at the Emer­ald Ash Bor­er (EAB).

Accord­ing to the NYS DEC, The EAB is a bee­tle from Asia that was first found in Michi­gan in 2002. Sad­ly, the EAB infests and even­tu­al­ly kills North Amer­i­can Ash tree species, mak­ing every native Ash tree sus­cep­ti­ble to infes­ta­tion.

Let’s get a clos­er look!

The EAB is very small, mea­sur­ing, at most, 0.5 inch­es long and 0.125 inch­es wide. The adults have a shim­mer­ing emer­ald green body with a cop­per or pur­ple abdomen on it’s under­side. You’ll often see these pests from May through Sep­tem­ber, but their prime activ­i­ty months are June and July. If you pass by an Ash tree, you will most like­ly see D‑shaped exit holes in the branch­es and trunk of trees. Oth­er signs of infec­tion include the yel­low­ing and brown­ing of tree leaves and less tree canopy present. With­in 2 to 4 years, the Ash trees will suc­cumb to the EAB infes­ta­tion.

ID the Emerald Ash Borer. photo courtesy of NYIS

ID the Emer­ald Ash Bor­er.
pho­to cour­tesy of NYIS

Emerald Ash Borer Larva inside an Ash tree. photo courtesy of Emerald Ash Borer Information Network

Emer­ald Ash Bor­er Lar­va inside an Ash tree.
pho­to cour­tesy of Emer­ald Ash Bor­er Infor­ma­tion Net­work

Emerald Ash Borer Damage to an Ash tree. photo courtesy of Woodworking Network

Emer­ald Ash Bor­er Dam­age to an Ash tree.
pho­to cour­tesy of Wood­work­ing Net­work

The EAB is found through­out the East­ern to Cen­tral Unit­ed States and East­ern Cana­da. In New York, the first infes­ta­tion of EAB was sight­ed in Cat­ta­rau­gus Coun­ty in 2009. It then spread to the Hud­son Riv­er Val­ley, and con­tin­ued on to more than 30 coun­ties. Infes­ta­tions were most recent­ly found in Franklin and St. Lawrence Coun­ties in 2017.

Map of Emerald Ash Borer Locations. courtesy of NYS DEC

Map of Emer­ald Ash Bor­er Loca­tions.
cour­tesy of NYS DEC

 What can you do?

Review this EAB Ear­ly Detec­tion Brochure. If you believe you have an Emer­ald Ash Bor­er infes­ta­tion and are out­side of the known infes­ta­tion areas, call the Depart­ment of For­est Health Infor­ma­tion line (1–866-640‑0652).


 

Keep up with us this week in hon­or of Nation­al Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week and check back tomor­row to learn about a dif­fer­ent Inva­sive Species!

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National Invasive Species Awareness Week 2018 — Japanese Knotweed

Posted on: February 26th, 2018 by Samantha Kahl

Feb­ru­ary 26th marks the begin­ning of Nation­al Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week! Through­out this week, until March 2nd, we will be explor­ing dif­fer­ent inva­sive species present with­in our water­shed. To start off this week, we must first ask our­selves, “What is an inva­sive species?”. An inva­sive species is a species that is non-native to an ecosys­tem and has the poten­tial to cause envi­ron­men­tal harm to an area. Inva­sive species often out-com­pete native species, giv­ing native species lit­tle chance for sur­vival; this includes both ter­res­tri­al and aquat­ic plants and ani­mals.

Japanese Knotweed within the Watershed

Japan­ese Knotweed with­in the Water­shed

The first inva­sive species we’ll look at is Japan­ese Knotweed. This mon­ster of a plant came to the U.S. as an orna­men­tal plant in the 1800’s from East­ern Asia. Knotweed is iden­ti­fied by its large heart-shaped leaves, hol­low bam­boo-like stalks, and clus­ters of white or cream col­ored flow­ers. It is often found near streams or rivers and it can with­stand low-light, high tem­per­a­tures, drought, and poor soil qual­i­ty, mak­ing this inva­sive resilient to many dif­fer­ent types of envi­ron­ments. Knotweed can grow up to 15 feet tall, with deep rhi­zomes (roots) extend­ing into the ground, mak­ing it very dif­fi­cult and time­ly to erad­i­cate.

Photo of Japanese Knotweed leaves & flowers courtesy of http://www.nyis.info

Pho­to of Japan­ese Knotweed leaves & flow­ers cour­tesy of http://www.nyis.info

Col­lab­o­ra­tion and coor­di­na­tion from as many peo­ple and orga­ni­za­tions as pos­si­ble is the best way to tack­le Japan­ese Knotweed. In order to con­trol it, one must be dili­gent. The Catskill Region­al Inva­sive Species Part­ner­ship (CRISP) rec­om­mends con­tin­u­ous man­u­al removal of Knotweed approx­i­mate­ly 2–3 times each year for at least 3 years, or until it is erad­i­cat­ed. Accord­ing to New York Inva­sive Species Infor­ma­tion (NYIS), mow­ing or cut­ting of Japan­ese Knotweed will actu­al­ly spread the plant, rather than con­tain it. For those who would like to use her­bi­cides on large vol­umes of Knotweed, call your local CCE or Soil and Water Con­ser­va­tion Dis­trict office to get more infor­ma­tion on chem­i­cal reg­u­la­tions and safe­ty pre­cau­tions in your region.

 

Videos regard­ing Inva­sive Species in New York State:

Pre­vent the Spread of Inva­sive Species

Get to Know Inva­sive Plants

 

Fol­low us this week as we uncov­er more inva­sive species in our Ashokan Water­shed! Face­bookTwit­terInsta­gram

 

 

 

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The Catskill Interpretive Center Riparian Buffer Demonstration Project Planted!

Posted on: November 15th, 2016 by Caroline Stupple
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Set­ting the stage to plant all of the native plant mate­r­i­al at the Catskill Inter­pre­tive Cen­ter.

In Sep­tem­ber 2016, a group of ded­i­cat­ed vol­un­teers, togeth­er with the Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Pro­gram (AWSMP) and the Catskill Streams Buffer Ini­tia­tive (CSBI) team, got togeth­er to remove some of the inva­sive species that had tak­en over the ripar­i­an (stream­side) areas and out-com­pet­ed native plants at the Mau­rice D. Hinchey Catskill Inter­pre­tive Cen­ter (CIC). The CIC received fund­ing from AWSMP and CSBI to cre­ate a Ripar­i­an Buffer Demon­stra­tion project.  The main objec­tives for this project are removal of inva­sive species, plant­i­ng of native plant mate­r­i­al, and plac­ing inter­pre­tive sig­nage around the project area to pro­vide edu­ca­tion on the role of ripar­i­an buffers in main­tain­ing habi­tat and stream health.

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The team (from left to right), Bob­by Tay­lor, Alli­son Lent, Jake Wede­mey­er, and Tiffany Runge of Ulster Coun­ty Soil and Water Con­ser­va­tion Dis­trict, removed a whole lot of inva­sive plant mate­r­i­al!

 

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Upstream of the Ripar­i­an Buffer Demon­stra­tion area. The under sto­ry is cov­ered in inva­sive species. This under sto­ry com­po­si­tion extend­ed towards the demon­stra­tion area.

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Ripar­i­an Buffer Demon­stra­tion project area cleared of inva­sive plants!

 

Ear­li­er this fall the CSBI team removed the last of the inva­sive plant mate­r­i­al and plant­ed the ripar­i­an buffer with native plants.  Inva­sive species are fast grow­ing, espe­cial­ly in dis­turbed areas, as such, as much plant mate­r­i­al as pos­si­ble was removed to give the native plants the best chance to estab­lish them­selves. Native ripar­i­an tree and shrub species form dense root sys­tems that pro­vide excel­lent bank sta­bi­liza­tion in ripar­i­an zones, an area that is prone to ero­sion. This com­plex root sys­tem con­trasts sharply to the shal­low and fast-grow­ing root sys­tems that inva­sive species have, that are part of their abil­i­ty to rapid­ly col­o­nize an area. A restored ripar­i­an buffer pro­vides nat­ur­al habi­tat for native species and enhances water qual­i­ty, an impor­tant resource for humans, native fish and macro-inver­te­brates.

 

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Ripar­i­an buffer area cleared of inva­sive plants.

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The native trees and shrubs are plant­ed!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The CIC Ripar­i­an Buffer Demon­stra­tion is a col­lab­o­ra­tive project between The Catskill Cen­ter, the NYS Depart­ment of Envi­ron­men­tal Con­ser­va­tion, NYC Depart­ment of Envi­ron­men­tal Pro­tec­tion, Cor­nell Coop­er­a­tive Exten­sion of Ulster Coun­ty, and the Ulster Coun­ty Soil & Water Con­ser­va­tion Dis­trict.

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Out With The Invasive, In With The Native

Posted on: September 12th, 2016 by Caroline Stupple

On Sat­ur­day, Sep­tem­ber 10th the Catskill Inter­pre­tive Cen­ter (CIC) held a vol­un­teer inva­sive pull event on their prop­er­ty. The area is to be pre­pared for a Ripar­i­an Buffer Demon­stra­tion project lead by the Catskill Streams Buffer Ini­tia­tive (CSBI). The CIC received fund­ing from the Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Pro­gram (AWSMP) and CSBI to remove the inva­sive species, replace them with native trees and shrubs, and cre­ate edu­ca­tion­al mate­r­i­al to inform the com­mu­ni­ty on the impor­tance of stream­side buffers.

Bob­by Tay­lor, CSBI Coor­di­na­tor, teach­ing the vol­un­teers how to iden­ti­fy com­mon ripar­i­an inva­sive plant species.

Our day start­ed off with a short pre-event rain storm that helped to cool off the pre­vi­ous mug­gi­ness of the day. Once all of the vol­un­teers gath­ered, CSBI coor­di­na­tor Bob­by Tay­lor held an edu­ca­tion­al talk about inva­sive species’ role in the envi­ron­ment and dif­fer­ent impor­tant man­age­ment options. We were pleased to learn just how much our par­tic­i­pants already know about inva­sives and how pas­sion­ate they are about lim­it­ing inva­sive species spread and man­ag­ing them on their own prop­er­ties. Our con­ver­sa­tions touched on just how eas­i­ly inva­sive species out­com­pete native species and decrease bio­di­ver­si­ty and how they can dras­ti­cal­ly affect native organ­isms that rely on native habi­tat. It is always inspir­ing to inter­act with com­mu­ni­ty mem­bers who are deal­ing with and care about the same issues we are tack­ling.

With shov­els, pick­ax­es, uproot­ers, bugspray, and sheer deter­mi­na­tion in hand, the vol­un­teers set out with one mis­sion; to get those pesky plants out! And boy did that deter­mi­na­tion go a long way! We were utter­ly blown away at how great of a team the vol­un­teers made and how much mate­r­i­al we were able to clear. As our day wound down we had a love­ly pic­nic lunch, pro­vid­ed by the CIC, and got to sit down with the vol­un­teers and get to know them a bit. Our pro­duc­tive day end­ed with good food and great com­pa­ny!

Vol­un­teers iden­ti­fy and pull inva­sive species at the Ripar­i­an Buffer Demon­stra­tion project site at the CIC.

At the root of the pull project and the impend­ing ripar­i­an restora­tion in the fall, is the impor­tance of stream buffers to water qual­i­ty, habi­tat, and flood­plain sta­bil­i­ty.  A small ephemer­al stream, one that has flow­ing water dur­ing and fol­low­ing a rain fall or snow melt event, runs through the back of the CIC prop­er­ty; adja­cent to the stream is the spe­cial zone called the flood­plain. These flood­plains are high­ly sus­cep­ti­ble to inva­sive species because seeds and frag­ments of plant mate­r­i­al can so eas­i­ly be car­ried by flow­ing water and deposit­ed down­stream.

This issue is far from only being a stream­side prob­lem. Many peo­ple, groups, and even gov­ern­ment agen­cies deal with inva­sive species man­age­ment on a dai­ly basis. It takes all mem­bers of a com­mu­ni­ty to real­ly stop the inva­sion and elim­i­nate the future intro­duc­tion of non­na­tive and inva­sive species. Our amaz­ing group of vol­un­teers was not only hard­work­ing, but also enthu­si­as­tic about envi­ron­men­tal pro­tec­tion, con­tin­u­ing their own fight against inva­sives on their prop­er­ties, and help­ing to edu­cate oth­ers to do the same.

CSBI, AWSMP,the CIC, and the NYS Depart­ment of Envi­ron­men­tal Con­ser­va­tion wants to thank all those who par­tic­i­pat­ed and made our Inva­sive Pull Event a suc­cess on all lev­els!

If you would like to learn more about inva­sive species, what you can do, or about the sup­port avail­able to stream­side landown­ers please vis­it the CSBI web­site at http://catskillstreams.org/ or con­tact CSBI Coor­di­na­tor Bob­by Tay­lor at bobby.taylor@ashokanstreams.org. If you would like to learn more about the Ashokan Water­shed please vis­it AWSM­P’s web­site at ashokanstreams.org or con­tact us at 845 688 3047.

 

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It is Invasive Species Awareness Week!

Posted on: July 15th, 2016 by Caroline Stupple

Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week (ISAW) is a col­lab­o­ra­tion between mul­ti­ple region­al, state, and fed­er­al agen­cies. ISAW seeks to enhance aware­ness of inva­sive species and pro­vide peo­ple with tools for man­age­ment. Local­ly, through­out the Catskill area, the Catskill Region­al Inva­sive Species Part­ner­ship (CRISP) pro­vides edu­ca­tion­al mate­r­i­al and sup­port for inva­sive species removal. A focal species for man­age­ment has been Japan­ese knotweed.

Japan­ese Knotweed was intro­duced to the Unit­ed States some­time in the late 1800s and was tout­ed as an excel­lent gar­den orna­men­tal plant. It was soon iden­ti­fied as an inva­sive species due to its aggres­sive spread through­out and beyond the region of intro­duc­tion and its ten­den­cy to out­com­pete native plant species.  In Ulster Coun­ty, though we are not alone in this strug­gle, we have seen the tremen­dous spread of knotweed espe­cial­ly along stream sides. Its migra­tion is high­ly effi­cient along these buffer zones due to its abil­i­ty to reestab­lish a new stand from a small root frag­ment washed down­stream.

 

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Japan­ese knotweed stand along left side of stream. Pho­to by Ulster Coun­ty Soil and Water Con­ser­va­tion Dis­trict.

 

Knotweed can be iden­ti­fied by its large heart-shaped leaves, hol­low bam­boo-like stalks, and the clus­ter of white or cream col­ored flow­ers. Stands of knotweed are immense­ly dif­fi­cult and time con­sum­ing to erad­i­cate, how­ev­er, it can be man­aged with vig­i­lance and patience. Among oth­er man­age­ment plans, CRISP sug­gests rou­tine and con­tin­u­ous removal of knotweed stands or her­bi­cide injec­tions into the stocks.  Man­u­al removal of knotweed can be time con­sum­ing, as removals must reoc­cur 2–3 times every year for 3 or more years. Addi­tion­al­ly, due to the ease with which knotweed spreads the herba­ceous mate­r­i­al must be dis­posed of prop­er­ly; dis­pos­al includes let­ting the mate­r­i­al dry out and burn­ing it when dried. Injec­tion of the her­bi­cide is also time con­sum­ing and may not be prac­ti­cal for a large knotweed stand. The her­bi­cide must be inject­ed into each stalk at approx­i­mate­ly the 3rd node on the stalk dur­ing the late sum­mer and ear­ly fall months.

The bat­tle against Japan­ese knotweed is best fought on many fronts and with coor­di­na­tion and efforts from as many peo­ple as pos­si­ble. If you would like to know more about how you can help with Japan­ese knotweed erad­i­ca­tion and man­age­ment in your area, or would like to learn more about oth­er inva­sive species in the area, please click here to be direct­ed to the CRISP web­site. If you would like to learn more about the annu­al Inva­sive Species Aware­ness Week and to get more infor­ma­tion about New York inva­sive species, please click here.

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Videos from 2015 Ashokan Watershed Conference Available Online

Posted on: May 14th, 2015 by Brent Gotsch

Full length videos from the 2015 Ashokan Water­shed Con­fer­ence held on April 10 at the Ashokan Cen­ter in Olive­bridge are now avail­able for view­ing on the AWSMP Youtube chan­nel.

Watch and lis­ten as Bob Steud­ing speaks about the build­ing of the Ashokan Reser­voir and the social forces that drove it. Learn from Pro­fes­sion­al Engi­neer George Fowler how his­tor­i­cal stream man­age­ment prac­tices have caused last­ing impacts on our region’s streams. Become engaged while lis­ten­ing to for­est ento­mol­o­gist Mark Whit­more and Town of Wood­stock Envi­ron­men­tal Com­mis­sion Chair­man Jim Han­son explain how inva­sive insects like Hem­lock Wool­ly Adel­gid and Emer­ald Ash Bor­er are threat­en­ing our native forests, the impacts they will cause and the work that com­mu­ni­ties need to do to pre­pare for them. Final­ly,  hear from a pan­el of “steam experts” as they answer some of the more com­mon and press­ing ques­tions that the pub­lic has about streams and how they are man­aged.

This is a great oppor­tu­ni­ty for those who missed the con­fer­ence but want to hear the speak­er pre­sen­ta­tions, or for those who attend­ed and want to revis­it some infor­ma­tion  they may have for­got­ten. There are a num­ber of oth­er great videos from past con­fer­ences and events on the chan­nel so be sure to check those out too!

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