Posts Tagged ‘watershed’

Now Hiring for AWSMP

Posted on: July 27th, 2022 by Leslie_Zucker

Cornell Cooperative Extension of Ulster County (CCEUC) is seeking a science education and communications professional to fill the role of Watershed Educator in Ulster County. 

The primary focus of the Watershed Educator’s work will be to develop and deliver stream and floodplain education programs to adult audiences, including members of the general watershed public, landowners, and local municipal officials. 

The Watershed Educator’s primary work location will be the Ashokan Watershed Stream Management Program (AWSMP) office in Shokan, NY. Half the position’s time will be spent working to deliver the AWSMP in the NYC Water Supply Watershed in the Catskills region of northwest Ulster County. The remainder of time will be worked on projects outside the NYC Watershed from CCEUC’s primary office in Kingston, NY. Partial work from home arrangements are possible, but the Educator must be able to travel easily within Ulster County.

Click here to learn more and apply by August 22: https://cornell.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/en-US/CCECareerPage/job/New-York-State-Other/Watershed-Educator—Shokan–NY_WDR-00032596

Videos from 2015 Ashokan Watershed Conference Available Online

Posted on: May 14th, 2015 by Leslie_Zucker

Full length videos from the 2015 Ashokan Watershed Conference held on April 10 at the Ashokan Center in Olivebridge are now available for viewing on the AWSMP Youtube channel.

Watch and listen as Bob Steuding speaks about the building of the Ashokan Reservoir and the social forces that drove it. Learn from Professional Engineer George Fowler how historical stream management practices have caused lasting impacts on our region’s streams. Become engaged while listening to forest entomologist Mark Whitmore and Town of Woodstock Environmental Commission Chairman Jim Hanson explain how invasive insects like Hemlock Woolly Adelgid and Emerald Ash Borer are threatening our native forests, the impacts they will cause and the work that communities need to do to prepare for them. Finally,  hear from a panel of “steam experts” as they answer some of the more common and pressing questions that the public has about streams and how they are managed.

This is a great opportunity for those who missed the conference but want to hear the speaker presentations, or for those who attended and want to revisit some information  they may have forgotten. There are a number of other great videos from past conferences and events on the channel so be sure to check those out too!