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Stream Management Funding Available

Posted on: February 17th, 2021 by Leslie_Zucker

The Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Pro­gram is now accept­ing appli­ca­tions for stream and flood­plain man­age­ment projects in the Ashokan Reser­voir water­shed

Appli­ca­tions must be sub­mit­ted by Wednes­day, March 10, 2021.  

For more infor­ma­tion on who is eli­gi­ble and fund­ing pri­or­i­ties, vis­it: https://ashokanstreams.org/projects-funding/

To down­load the appli­ca­tion mate­ri­als:
Appli­ca­tion Form (Microsoft Word)
Appli­ca­tions Instruc­tions (pdf)

Fund­ing for the Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Imple­men­ta­tion Pro­gram is pro­vid­ed by the NYC Depart­ment of Envi­ron­men­tal Pro­tec­tion. Stream Man­age­ment Imple­men­ta­tion Pro­gram grants are admin­is­tered by Cor­nell Coop­er­a­tive Exten­sion of Ulster Coun­ty and reviewed by the AWSMP Stake­hold­er Coun­cil. 

For more infor­ma­tion or to sched­ule a meet­ing or site vis­it, con­tact Leslie Zuck­er at laz5@cornell.edu or call AWSMP at (845) 688‑3047.

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Showshoe Stream Walk along the Little Beaver Kill February 13th

Posted on: January 29th, 2021 by Brent Gotsch

Reg­is­ter now for a Win­ter Snow­shoe Stream Walk with the Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Pro­gram along a trib­u­tary to the Lit­tle Beaver Kill on the grounds of Ken­neth Wil­son State Camp­ground locat­ed at 859 Wit­ten­berg Road in Mount Trem­per, NY from 10:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Sat­ur­day, Feb­ru­ary 13, 2021. If there is not enough snow for snow­shoe­ing, a “No-Snow” date is sched­uled for Sat­ur­day, Feb­ru­ary 20. If there is still no snow on this date, a reg­u­lar stream walk will be held with­out snow­shoes.

Snow­shoes and walk­ing poles will be pro­vid­ed, though, par­tic­i­pants are encour­aged to bring their own gear. Those with lim­it­ed or no expe­ri­ence snow­shoe­ing are encour­aged to attend. Instruc­tion on how to snow­shoe prop­er­ly and safe­ly will be giv­en before ven­tur­ing out on the trail.

The walk will be approx­i­mate­ly 2 hours in length on NYS Depart­ment of Envi­ron­men­tal Con­ser­va­tion land. Walk is designed for begin­ners but the group at times may go off trail. Dur­ing the walk, edu­ca­tors from Cor­nell Coop­er­a­tive Exten­sion of Ulster Coun­ty will share infor­ma­tion about local streams and pro­tect­ing water resources, and we will inves­ti­gate signs of local wildlife. There will be fre­quent stops to point out inter­est­ing fea­tures of the stream or to dis­cuss envi­ron­men­tal top­ics. Be sure to bring your own snack and bev­er­age.

Meet at the Ken­neth Wil­son State Camp­ground park­ing area at 859 Wit­ten­berg Road by 10:00 am. Par­tic­i­pants must fill out and return a Lia­bil­i­ty and Media Release Form and a Stream Safe­ty Pledge in order to par­tic­i­pate.

The event is free of charge, but space is lim­it­ed. Please reg­is­ter ear­ly to hold your spot. Reg­is­ter online at https://cceulster.mahaplatform.com/events/snowshoestreamwalk or con­tact Brent Gotsch at the AWSMP office at bwg37@cornell.edu or 845–688‑3047 ext.103.

This pro­gram is fund­ed by the NYC Depart­ment of Envi­ron­men­tal Pro­tec­tion.

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AWSMP Provides Watershed-Based Remote Learning during Pandemic

Posted on: January 26th, 2021 by Brent Gotsch
Water­shed Youth Edu­ca­tor Matt Savat­gy pro­vid­ing remote learn­ing sci­ence edu­ca­tion for ele­men­tary school stu­dents in the Onte­o­ra Cen­tral School Dis­trict. Pho­to by Bai­ley Savat­gy.

Despite the ongo­ing pan­dem­ic, the Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Pro­gram (AWSMP) has found a way to pro­vide water­shed-based sci­ence edu­ca­tion to Onte­o­ra Cen­tral School Dis­trict ele­men­tary stu­dents.

Work­ing direct­ly with teach­ers, our youth edu­ca­tor, Matt Savat­gy, has been pro­vid­ing remote instruc­tion­al sup­port since last fall. Regard­less of whether they are at school or at home, stu­dents join Matt each week for a live Google Class­room sci­ence ses­sion. A wide range of water­shed-relat­ed top­ics are cov­ered through­out the school year. Accord­ing to Matt, “Much of the ele­men­tary school sci­ence cur­ricu­lum is direct­ly relat­able to the Ashokan Water­shed, par­tic­u­lar­ly in fourth grade.”

Savat­gy uses short video clips, lots of back-and-forth dis­cus­sions, demon­stra­tions, spec­i­mens from his exten­sive nat­ur­al his­to­ry col­lec­tion, and games to help stu­dents grasp required sci­en­tif­ic con­cepts.  Ben­nett Ele­men­tary School Teacher Eliz­a­beth Lef­ferts says, “My stu­dents eager­ly look for­ward to each of our sci­ence ses­sions with Mr. Savat­gy and the inter­ac­tive activ­i­ties they know are await­ing them.”

As a way to extend learn­ing beyond the remote class­room meet­ings stu­dents are pro­vid­ed with video links and activ­i­ty resources for them to try at home and they are encour­aged to use them while explor­ing their local out­door set­ting. Fourth Grade teacher, Liz Cor­sit­to, indi­cat­ed that, “This year has been dif­fi­cult to nav­i­gate in terms of teach­ing and learn­ing vir­tu­al­ly. Matt has stepped in to encour­age our stu­dents to still love sci­ence even though it is being deliv­ered vir­tu­al­ly and to get involved in the sci­ence that sur­rounds them at home.”

The Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Pro­gram also pro­vides numer­ous oppor­tu­ni­ties out­side of school for stu­dents to learn about the impor­tance of streams and our water­shed. A cou­ple of these activ­i­ties include: The Water­shed Detec­tives after­school pro­gram and the annu­al Stream Explor­ers Youth Adven­ture. To learn more about these pro­grams and AWSMP, vis­it ashokanstreams.org.

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December Flooding in Ashokan Watershed and Resource for Homeowners

Posted on: January 11th, 2021 by Brent Gotsch
Flood­ing at McK­en­ley Hol­low Bridge 12-25-2020. Pho­to by A. Ben­nett.

Res­i­dents of the Ashokan Water­shed unwrapped a present they prob­a­bly didn’t want this past Christ­mas in the form of sig­nif­i­cant flood­ing on many of our streams. Most of the Unit­ed States Geo­log­i­cal Sur­vey (USGS) stream gages report­ed that most of the flood­ing would be con­sid­ered a 10-Year Flood, which has a 10% chance of occur­ring in any giv­en year. While not as large or destruc­tive as the floods result­ing from Trop­i­cal Storm Irene in August of 2011, there still was sig­nif­i­cant dam­age to local infra­struc­ture and ero­sion along our stream chan­nels.

Over the past year there are many new res­i­dents now liv­ing full-time in the Water­shed who may not be aware of the flood­ing issues that peri­od­i­cal­ly occur in our val­leys, up our hol­lows, and along our streams. This post is meant to pro­vide some basic infor­ma­tion for res­i­dents on how to iden­ti­fy flood risk for their home, what to do if there are dam­ages to prop­er­ty, and who to con­tact for addi­tion­al infor­ma­tion.

Most of the major streams in the water­shed have been mapped for flood risk by the Fed­er­al Emer­gency Man­age­ment Agency through the Nation­al Flood Insur­ance Pro­gram (NFIP). To view your flood risk and deter­mine if your prop­er­ty is locat­ed with­in the 100-Year Flood­plain (which sta­tis­ti­cal­ly speak­ing has a 1% chance of occur­ring in any giv­en year) you can vis­it the FEMA Map Ser­vice Cen­ter, input your address and look at the shad­ing. If you see a turquoise col­or that means you are locat­ed in the 100-Year Flood­plain. You can also access the same infor­ma­tion by vis­it­ing the Nation­al Flood Haz­ard Lay­er, which may be a bit more user friend­ly. Please keep in mind that flood­plain map­ping is meant for flood insur­ance rat­ing pur­pos­es only. Just because your prop­er­ty is locat­ed out­side the 100 or 500-Year Flood­plains (the 500-Year Flood­plain is rep­re­sent­ed by orange shad­ing) that does not mean you are guar­an­teed to not have a flood. Rough­ly 20% of all flood dam­ages occur out­side the 100-Year Flood zone. If you do not already have flood insur­ance for your struc­ture you should con­sid­er get­ting it. Vis­it Floodsmart.gov (the offi­cial site of the Nation­al Flood Insur­ance Pro­gram) or con­tact your insur­ance agent and inquire about flood insur­ance.

A vari­ety of dam­age can occur to a build­ing fol­low­ing a flood. It is vital that you sched­ule a vis­it with your municipality’s build­ing depart­ment to doc­u­ment the extent of the dam­age. If a struc­ture is sub­stan­tial­ly dam­aged (mean­ing that 51% or more of the structure’s fair mar­ket val­ue is dam­aged) then cer­tain pro­ce­dures need to be put into place and often the struc­ture will need to be ele­vat­ed (in the case of res­i­den­tial struc­tures) or flood­proofed (in the case of non-res­i­den­tial struc­tures). There may be some fund­ing avail­able to mit­i­gate flood­ing if the prop­er­ty has flood insur­ance. For more infor­ma­tion, please vis­it the NYS Depart­ment of Envi­ron­men­tal Conservation’s web­site on sub­stan­tial dam­age.

Very often dur­ing a flood, homes with base­ments have stand­ing water in them. Some­times this is a result of over­land flood­ing (flood­ing from rivers and streams) or infil­tra­tion from ground water. Regard­less of the source, the base­ment should have the water pumped out. Sump pumps can be used to do this or for a fee many local fire depart­ments will pump out base­ments. Do not enter a home with stand­ing water unless you know for cer­tain that the pow­er to the struc­ture has been cut.

If you own stream­side prop­er­ty where ero­sion occurred or where the stream chan­nel shift­ed or moved, you can con­tact the Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Pro­gram (AWSMP) at 845–688-3047. Leave a mes­sage and a tech­ni­cian from the Ulster Coun­ty Soil and Water Con­ser­va­tion Dis­trict will get back to you and arrange a site vis­it to view your stream and to offer you advice on what can be done to help mit­i­gate future ero­sion. Keep in mind that because of the recent flood­ing our tech­ni­cians are very busy and restric­tions based on the ongo­ing Covid-19 pan­dem­ic may cause a delay.

Flood­ing and dam­age that result from flood­ing can be very stress­ful and expen­sive to fix. If you live with­in the Ashokan Water­shed and expe­ri­ence dam­age to your struc­ture dur­ing a flood, we also rec­om­mend you con­tact Aaron Ben­nett at the Ulster Coun­ty Depart­ment of Envi­ron­ment at 845–688-3047 ext. 109 or email aben@co.ulster.ny.us for fur­ther assis­tance. If you have ques­tions about how to mit­i­gate your home for floods be sure to read the FEMA Home­own­ers Guide to Retro­fitting.

If you have gen­er­al ques­tions about flood­ing, how to read a flood map or deter­mine if your prop­er­ty is locat­ed in a mapped flood­plain or if you may need flood insur­ance please con­tact Brent Gotsch of Cor­nell Coop­er­a­tive Exten­sion of Ulster Coun­ty at 845–688-3047 ex. 103 or bwg37@cornell.edu.

If you have gen­er­al ques­tions about streams and ero­sion you can con­tact Tim Koch of Cor­nell Coop­er­a­tive Exten­sion of Ulster Coun­ty at 845–688-3047 ext. 118 or tk545@cornell.edu.

Please be sure to vis­it the AWSMP web­site at www.ashokanstreams.org for addi­tion­al infor­ma­tion about flood­ing and stream man­age­ment.

Flood­ing along Oliv­erea Road 12-25-2020. Pho­to by A. Ben­nett.
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Request for Images from December Flood

Posted on: January 7th, 2021 by Brent Gotsch
Multiple images showing evidence of high water such as deposited tree branches and flooded roadways
Above are exam­ples of images that AWSMP is request­ing for the Decem­ber 2020 Flood Event

The Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Pro­gram (AWSMP) is request­ing images and video of flood­ing that occurred from last month’s rain-on-snowmelt storm of Christ­mas Eve into Christ­mas Day. We are most inter­est­ed in flood­ing that occurred in the Ashokan Water­shed munic­i­pal­i­ties of Hur­ley, Olive, Shan­dak­en, and Wood­stock. Images of water spilling out over stream­banks, over­top­ping roads, impact­ing build­ings and infra­struc­ture (bridges, cul­verts, etc.) are what we are most inter­est­ed in. Also impor­tant and very help­ful are post-flood images show­ing wood or grav­el debris piles indi­cat­ing what are called “high water marks”.

Any­one with images or videos that they would like to share should con­tact Aaron Ben­nett at aben@co.ulster.ny.us. Those who choose to share images or video will need to fill out a Media Release form that gives us per­mis­sion to use the images/video. Com­pen­sa­tion will not be giv­en for use of the images/video. These images will be used to help bet­ter under­stand the nature of flood­ing in the Ashokan Water­shed and be used to help mod­el future flood events.

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Major Flooding Underway

Posted on: December 25th, 2020 by Leslie_Zucker

The Eso­pus Creek is fore­cast to reach major flood stage this morn­ing. The Nation­al Weath­er Ser­vice has issued a flood warn­ing. You can mon­i­tor actu­al stream con­di­tions at the U.S. Geo­log­i­cal Sur­vey links for indi­vid­ual stream gages below:
Cold­brook
Allaben
If you are stay­ing in a home or rental prop­er­ty locat­ed adja­cent to a stream in the flood­plain, seek high­er ground imme­di­ate­ly. Call 911 if you are sur­round­ed by water. Local emer­gency ser­vices are trained in swift water res­cue tech­niques.

If you are not in imme­di­ate dan­ger — stay home if pos­si­ble. Low lay­ing sec­tions of roads near streams may be flood­ed and severe­ly dam­aged. Do not dri­ve through stand­ing water. Stream flows in the Catskills are pow­er­ful — roads, bridges and cul­verts may be com­plete­ly washed away leav­ing a gap­ing hole beneath the water sur­face. Wait for flood­wa­ters to recede and fol­low the guid­ance of local author­i­ties.

Town of Shan­dak­en
Town of Olive
Town of Wood­stock
Town of Hur­ley
Ulster Coun­ty Emer­gency Man­age­ment

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Best Wishes for the New Year from the AWSMP

Posted on: December 23rd, 2020 by Leslie_Zucker
Image of ice covered rock in small wooded stream

The staff of the Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Pro­gram wish the won­der­ful res­i­dents and vis­i­tors of the Ashokan Water­shed a bright and hap­py hol­i­day and new year.

It was a plea­sure to work on stream projects with munic­i­pal offi­cials, stream­side landown­ers, non­prof­it and agency part­ners, con­sul­tant firm staff, teach­ers and stu­dents, and pro­gram par­tic­i­pants over the past year.

We hope you have the chance to safe­ly enjoy being near a stream dur­ing this rest­ful win­ter sea­son!

Image of two people snow shoeing on a trail near stream
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Watershed Detectives Club Is Off To A Great Start

Posted on: October 22nd, 2020 by Brent Gotsch
A scene from the inau­gur­al ses­sion of the 2020 Water­shed Detec­tives Pro­gram held at the Ashokan Cen­ter. Pho­to by Matt Helf­frich

The ongo­ing COVID-19 pan­dem­ic has forced many events and activ­i­ties to be can­celled or switched to an online for­mat and for good rea­son. Tra­di­tion­al school­ing for many stu­dents in the water­shed has moved online ful­ly or in a hybrid of online and lim­it­ed in-per­son teach­ing. Most after­school activ­i­ties on school grounds have been can­celled indef­i­nite­ly. Sad­ly, because of this there is a dearth of oppor­tu­ni­ties for extracur­ric­u­lar activ­i­ties around most sub­jects, though espe­cial­ly sci­ence edu­ca­tion. While the con­cern about the safe­ty of in-per­son edu­ca­tion is war­rant­ed, there are ways to hold in-per­son edu­ca­tion that reduces the risk of expo­sure to the virus. In an effort to pro­vide alter­na­tive pro­gram oppor­tu­ni­ties and to get stu­dents safe­ly engaged in a stream-based and water­shed cur­ricu­lum, AWSMP has relaunched our pop­u­lar Water­shed Detec­tives Pro­gram with added safe­ty fea­tures.

Water­shed Detec­tives has tra­di­tion­al­ly been an after­school pro­gram held at the Ben­nett Inter­me­di­ate School in Boiceville for grades 4–6. This year, instead of being held on school grounds the pro­gram is being offered at the Ashokan Cen­ter in near­by Olive­bridge, NY and for stu­dents in grades 4–8. Hold­ing the pro­gram at the Ashokan Cen­ter allows for good phys­i­cal dis­tanc­ing between stu­dents and access to the Ashokan Center’s numer­ous trails, streams and forests for learn­ing and dis­cov­ery. Sev­er­al safe­ty pro­to­cols have been put in place along with strict san­i­ta­tion pro­ce­dures to reduce the pos­si­bil­i­ty of infec­tion. While the loca­tion has changed the same great pro­gram­ming is tak­ing place where stu­dents will learn about the impor­tance of streams, water­sheds, and ripar­i­an areas.

“It has def­i­nite­ly been a chal­lenge get­ting this year’s pro­gram up and run­ning, but we have a sol­id plan in place in an effort to keep things run­ning smooth­ly,” says Matt Savat­gy, AWSMP Youth Edu­ca­tor and leader of the Water­shed Detective’s Pro­gram. “The kids are real­ly enjoy­ing being togeth­er, out­doors with their friends and are active­ly engaged in learn­ing to become stew­ards for our water­shed.”

Cur­rent­ly, the pro­gram is full. How­ev­er, AWSMP hopes to have more youth and adult pro­grams in the com­ing months. Please reg­u­lar­ly check our web­page for upcom­ing events and pro­grams offered both online and in-per­son.

The 2020 Water­shed Detec­tives Emblem
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CSBI Ready for Fall Plantings

Posted on: October 14th, 2020 by Brent Gotsch
AWSMP Plant Mate­r­i­al Cen­ter, Fall 2020. Pho­to by Bob­by Tay­lor.

If some­one were to step into the back­yard of the Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Pro­gram (AWSMP) you could for­give them for think­ing they were on the grounds of a plant nurs­ery. That’s because our back­yard is home to the Catskill Streams Buffer Ini­tia­tive (CSBI) Plant Mate­r­i­al Cen­ter (PMC). The PMC is the loca­tion that holds all the plants that we use to reveg­e­tate stream­banks here in the Ashokan Water­shed. CSBI seeks to inform and assist landown­ers with bet­ter stew­ard­ship of their ripar­i­an (stream­side) area through pro­tec­tion, enhance­ment, man­age­ment, or restora­tion. CSBI recent­ly received a large deliv­ery of plants that AWSMP staff helped unload and sort in the PMC.

The plants in these pho­tos will be used in eight plant­i­ng sites this fall and com­ing spring where approx­i­mate­ly 79,156 square feet of stream­bank are slat­ed to be reveg­e­tat­ed. To date 65 landown­ers have had projects com­plet­ed on their prop­er­ties. Over 10,000 trees and shrubs have been plant­ed and over 18,510 feet of stream (or 3.5 miles) have been reveg­e­tat­ed. All told 13.153 acres have been restored since 2009.

Not just any plants are used in these projects. Ripar­i­an plants that are native to the Catskill region are uti­lized for sev­er­al rea­sons. Ripar­i­an plants have strong and robust root sys­tems that grow deep into the soil and inter­lock with roots sys­tems of adja­cent plants. This helps keep the plants firm­ly root­ed in the soil dur­ing floods and has the added ben­e­fit of min­i­miz­ing stream­bank ero­sion. Native Catskill Moun­tain region plants fill an impor­tant eco­log­i­cal niche that non-native plants usu­al­ly do not fill. They pro­vide habi­tat for an assort­ment of oth­er plants and ani­mals includ­ing pol­li­na­tors like bees and but­ter­flies. They pro­vide cov­er for ani­mals help­ing to shield them from preda­tors and shade the stream, keep­ing the water cool for sev­er­al fish species that thrive in cold­er water, such as native brook trout. Fur­ther­more, native ripar­i­an plants are more suit­ed for their envi­ron­ment and require less main­te­nance than non-native orna­men­tal veg­e­ta­tion.

Sev­er­al of the native ripar­i­an plants that are used will be famil­iar to most peo­ple. These include tree species such as red maple (Acer rubrum), sug­ar maple (Acer sac­cha­rum), red oak (Quer­cus rubra), white oak (Quer­cus alba), paper birch (Betu­la papyrifera) and sycamore (Pla­tanus occi­den­tal­is) to name just a few. It also includes shrubs such as win­ter­ber­ry (Ilex ver­ti­cil­late), witch hazel (Hamamelis vir­gini­ana), mead­owsweet (Spi­raea lat­i­fo­lia), elder­ber­ry (Sam­bu­cus nigra), choke­ber­ry (Aro­nia arbu­ti­fo­lia), and but­ton­bush (Cepha­lan­thus occi­den­tal­is) among many oth­ers. In addi­tion, there are sev­er­al dif­fer­ent types of sedges, which are a type of grass that likes to grow in wet, ripar­i­an areas. The PMC cur­rent­ly holds 61 dif­fer­ent species of native plant and there are cur­rent­ly over 2,000 plants in the PMC. The vast major­i­ty will be plant­ed this fall. Any plants not used will be cov­ered in mulch and over­win­tered until the spring where they will be used in plant­i­ng projects for that sea­son.

Projects for this sea­son are already sched­uled, but if you’re inter­est­ed in par­tic­i­pat­ing in the CSBI pro­gram in a future sea­son and have stream­side prop­er­ty in the Ashokan Water­shed, con­tact the CSBI Coor­di­na­tor, Bob­by Tay­lor at 845–688-3047 or at bobby.taylor@ashokanstreams.org.

AWSMP Plant Mate­r­i­al Cen­ter, Fall 2020. Pho­to by Brent Gotsch.
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AWSMP Hosts Successful Fall Foliage Walk

Posted on: October 6th, 2020 by Brent Gotsch
AWSMP Edu­ca­tor Matt Savat­gy teach­es about water­sheds dur­ing a hike on the Ashokan Quar­ry Trail

Last week on the morn­ing of Octo­ber 3rd, the Ashokan Water­shed Stream Man­age­ment Pro­gram (AWSMP) host­ed a fall foliage walk on the recent­ly opened Ashokan Quar­ry Trail in Olive­bridge, NY. AWSMP has a goal of host­ing safe, social­ly dis­tanced, in-per­son events if con­di­tions allow. While it may have been a lit­tle ear­ly to expe­ri­ence the fall col­ors at their peak, there was per­fect autumn weath­er and all ten par­tic­i­pants had an excel­lent time.

The Ashokan Quar­ry Trail opened ear­li­er this year and is an easy 2‑mile loop that can be com­plet­ed and enjoyed by hik­ers of all abil­i­ty lev­els. Key points of inter­est includ­ed the on-site quar­ry where stone used in the con­struc­tion of the Ashokan Reser­voir was har­vest­ed, an aban­doned rail­road grade and load­ing sta­tion, and a scenic vista where sev­er­al local moun­tain peaks could be viewed.  Along the route, AWSMP edu­ca­tors taught par­tic­i­pants about water­shed sci­ence, for­est ecol­o­gy, the his­to­ry of the site and its impor­tance in the con­struc­tion of the Ashokan Reser­voir.

AWSMP nor­mal­ly attends many com­mu­ni­ty events and func­tions through­out the year in the Ashokan Water­shed. How­ev­er, due to the ongo­ing COVID-19 pan­dem­ic, many of those events have been can­celled or post­poned. In an effort to keep in touch with our stream­side landown­ers and every­one who enjoys and ben­e­fits from the Ashokan Water­shed, AWSMP has shift­ed the major­i­ty of its edu­ca­tion and out­reach pro­gram­ming to an online for­mat. AWSMP edu­ca­tors have post­ed a num­ber edu­ca­tion­al videos to our YouTube page so be sure to check those out.

When New York entered Phase 4 of reopen­ing ear­li­er this year, AWSMP insti­tut­ed sev­er­al out­door, social­ly dis­tanced events. If con­di­tions and pub­lic health direc­tives allow, AWSMP hopes to have more of these types of events this win­ter as well as next spring and sum­mer.

Please vis­it the AWSMP web­site for the most up-to-date list­ings of events (online and in-per­son) and stay in touch through our Face­book, Twit­ter, and Insta­gram accounts.

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